BASH 1800s

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PHOTO CREDIT: Cape Cod Times/Steve Heaslip

BASH 1800s – Saturday, July 19, 2014

It’s the 1800s: The Boston & Sandwich Glass Factory is in its prime, The North and South are locked in a brutal Civil War, the game of “Base Ball” is in its infancy.

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Saturday was for the 1800s, with a special emphasis in the morning on the 291 Sandwich residents who served in the Civil War and the 54 among them who were killed.

Kyle Trainor is a Civil War buff, his mother Caroline said. The family lives in Dedham and Sandwich. “It was really fun,” Kyle said. “You get to see the soldiers and everybody. I liked the way they fired the guns.”

During the ceremony, the faux soldiers did truly fire their rifles, after being sworn into federal military service by Sandwich resident Jonathan Leonard VI, whose great-grandfather, also Jonathan Leonard, was a medical doctor in Sandwich during the Civil War.

The Cape Cod Chorale sang “My Country, Tis of Thee.” There were a few people on cell phones at the ceremony and a lot of to-go coffee cups, but the reading of the 54 names of the dead — many with last names such as “Wing” still common in town — seemed to sober the crowd.

“We actually planned it this way, and it came out,” Daley said afterward, when a woman walked up and told him he’d done a good job.

The morning started early, behind the Henry T. Wing School on Water Street, as the re-enactment soldiers, all from the 22nd Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, prepared for their march to Town Hall for the swearing-in ceremony.

Across the grass were others re-enacting the Civil War support services of the U.S. Sanitary Commission, a volunteer civilian group that provided things such as food, clothing and medical supplies. At one tent, Janet Hamilton of Kingston and Nicky Meola of Dorchester, both dressed in black hoop-skirt dresses, were setting up to do the soldiers’ laundry, with washboards at their feet and a clothesline strung between tree branches.

At 9:49 a.m., Sandwich High School history teacher Mike Welch, acting as the captain of the Sandwich Guard, called his troops to order.

The men, in gray pants and navy jackets, carried canteens, tin cups and leather satchels around their waists. They attached bayonets to their rifles and waited for a Sandwich police officer to stop the traffic on Water Street.

They and their helpers marched down the street, to a lone drum beat, past a busy tea shop and centuries-old houses and the 17th-century Dexter’s Grist Mill to the waiting crowd at Town Hall.

Follow Mary Ann Bragg on Twitter at @maryannbraggCCT.

Copyright © Cape Cod Media Group, a division of Ottaway Newspapers, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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(Credit: Sandwich Community Television)


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(Credit: Don Bayley)

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Schedule of Events:

Elements of the 22nd Mass. Volunteer Infantry

Elements of the 22nd Mass. Volunteer Infantry

8:30AM at the Wing School: It was 1861 and Sandwich had its own company – the Sandwich Guards, Company D, 29th Massachusetts Volunteers. Portrayed by the 22nd Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, they opened “Camp Chipman” with Posting the Colors.

9:00 – 9:30AM: Military Drill

9:45AM: Dress Parade Formation

TownHallSummer2013_20010:00AM: Parade from Wing School to Town Hall along Water St. with the Sandwich Guards, 3rd Mass. Light Artillery Battery C, U.S. Sanitary Commission and other 1800s period re-enactors.

 

10 – 10:15AM: at Town Hall: Cape Cod Choral sang Civil War songs until the troops arrived.

10:15AM: Ceremony at Town Hall:

 

Dr. Jonathan Leonard III (portrayed by Jonathan Leonard VI) administered the Federal Oath of Office to the troops and swore the Sandwich Guards into federal service for 3 years.

Major Sylvanus Phinney, original owner of the Barnstable Patriot (portrayed by Rob Sennott, former owner of the Barnstable Patriot) gave the 5 minute address that was made in 1861.

Captain Chipman (portrayed by Mike Welch) passed the flag that was given by Major Phinney to Lt. Kerns and made acceptance remarks.

 

Rignt Arm Flag

“Right Arm” Flag given by Major Phinney to Captain Chipman. Reproduced by Bill Diedering. (Click for larger view)

–The names of the 54 Sandwich soldiers who died from the war were read with a bell ringing ceremony.

–Closing Ceremony with Cape Cod Choral singing of the Battle Hymn of the Republic

–Troops marched back to Camp Chipman (Wing School) bearing the company flag.

10AM – 4PM: Lions Club served food at Wing School

11AM – 3PM: Horse-drawn Wagon was pulled by a team of white horses around the village.

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11AM – 4PM: Back at Camp Chipman the troops performed drills and demonstrations. The 3rd Massachusetts Light Artillery gave canon firing demonstrations, Members from the US Sanitary Commission had field tents and explained their role in the Civil War.

Noon – 4PM: 19th century Quilt Show upstairs at Town Hall. 21 quilts were on display with a musical background performance by Kristin and Brendan McGillicuddy on piano and violin.  VIEW QUILT DESCRIPTIONS.

 

Denya Levine

Denya Levine

1PM – 2PM: Fiddler Denya LeVine played 1800 era tunes at “Camp Chipman” (Wing School).

1:30PM – 3:30PM at Wing School: Old time Town Base Ball Game between the Mudville Base Ball Club and the Hingham Coopers.

2PM – 3PM: Tour of Burying Grounds on Grove Street by Jennifer Madden.

 

2:30PM – 3:30PM: Fiddler Denya LeVine played 1800 era tunes at “Camp Chipman” (Wing School).

7 – 9PM: Contra Dance at Town Hall, complete with musicians and caller.

 

sandwichglassmuseumThroughout the day: Notables from the past visited the Village including glass owner Deming Jarves, sea going Hannah Rebecca Burgess, Capt. Edward Nichols and glass workers Billy Eaton, Mary Gregory and Dan Fogarty.

 

The Sandwich Glass Museum told the story of the Sandwich Glass Factory with glass blowing demonstrations, exhibits, pictures and vintage Sandwich glass.

 

 

 

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